Monday, October 29, 2012

Our History

The hours are terrible. In fact, they are 24/7. All of the income goes back into the business. There are no paid benefits, no sick days and no vacation. The working conditions are not always favorable and risk of injury is possible. The love of job runs deep and never thinks of giving up.

You can buy stock. Of course, this kind of stock is either for milking or beef. Sometimes you take a day off and maybe even a vacation, but you are always on call. It is a profession that seems to be dying away in many parts of the country. Part of the reason is that the population is creeping out of the city into rural areas. Some newcomers are trying new methods, new ideas in farming. Changes have taken place over the years. But still there is a sameness to what went before.

It is not an easy life, this of the farmer. Yet it is a life cherished by those who live it. I think my dad enjoyed being at home where he could run into the house for a glass of water and a kiss from my mother. We were all part of this farm business doing chores and working in the fields. We were a family together most of the time. I feel sorry for those who have never experienced life in a farm family. My, what you have missed.....


We are the history of Darke county not just the history of our families. Within the soil is the life of the earth; the life of its inhabitants. Sons often find the way into the same fields. Daughters marry a future farmer from school. They are continuing this history of Darke County. They are protecting its rich cloak and closeness of community.

The rewards for the farmer are the crops they grow. The rewards of family and extended family. Of neighbors and friends. The rewards are the freedom to grow and build all on your own. And, there are enemies. Market value, government restrictions, weather and diseases lurk waiting to knock down the farmer. Yet time and time again, the farmer rises to the occasion and makes the best of it.

I cheer for the farmer and the families who thrive on the land. I am one of you...and so darn proud of it.


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